Which law taxed molasses and sugar by British colonies?

What law taxed sugar in the colonies?

Sugar Act, also called Plantation Act or Revenue Act, (1764), in U.S. colonial history, British legislation aimed at ending the smuggling trade in sugar and molasses from the French and Dutch West Indies and at providing increased revenues to fund enlarged British Empire responsibilities following the French and Indian …

What caused the Sugar Act of 1764?

The Sugar Act occurred when parliament decided to make a few adjustments to the trade regulations. … The causes of the Sugar Act include the reduced tax on molasses from 6 pence to 3 pence, increased tax on imports of foreign processed sugar, and the prohibition on importing foreign rum.

What did the Sugar Act of 1764 do that escalated Colonial American anger?

Correct! What did the Sugar Act of 1764 do that escalated colonial American anger regarding an existing tax on molasses imported from the French West Indies? It strengthened courts where accused molasses smugglers could be tried without a jury.

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Why did the British pass the Molasses Act?

The Molasses Act of 1733 was enacted by the British Parliament on the 13 colonies of America with the purpose of protecting its sugar plantations in the West Indies. … Instead of fair trade, British producers wanted to protect their market and lobbied Parliament for a tax on foreign molasses.

What was taxed in the Sugar Act?

Under the Molasses Act colonial merchants had been required to pay a tax of six pence per gallon on the importation of foreign molasses. … The act also listed more foreign goods to be taxed including sugar, certain wines, coffee, pimiento, cambric and printed calico, and further, regulated the export of lumber and iron.

Why did England began to tax the colonies?

Britain also needed money to pay for its war debts. The King and Parliament believed they had the right to tax the colonies. They decided to require several kinds of taxes from the colonists to help pay for the French and Indian War. … They protested, saying that these taxes violated their rights as British citizens.

Did the Sugar Act raise taxes?

One of the first measures passed to raise revenue from the American colonies was a tax on sugar. Grenville designed the American Revenue Act of l764, commonly known as the Sugar Act, to replace the Sugar and Molasses Act of 1733 which was to expire.

How did the Sugar Act affect colonists?

Strict enforcement of the Sugar Act successfully reduced smuggling, but it greatly disrupted the economy of the American colonies by increasing the cost of many imported items, and reducing exports to non-British markets.

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How did the colonies respond to the Sugar Act?

In response to the Sugar, Act colonists formed an organized boycott of luxury goods imported from Great Britain. 50 merchants from throughout the colonies agreed to boycott specific items and began a philosophy of self-sufficiency where they produce those products themselves, especially fabric-based products.

What two things did the colonists hate and feel were unfair?

They had to pay high taxes to the king. They felt that they were paying taxes to a government where they had no representation. They were also angry because the colonists were forced to let British soldiers sleep and eat in their homes.

Why were many colonists angry about the Sugar Act?

Why did the Proclamation of 1763 anger many colonists. … The colonies opposed the Sugar Act because the colonies felt that “taxation without representation” was tyranny and felt it was unfair that Britain taxed them on war exports.

What did the colonies gain?

In 1783, they were signed as final and definitive. The peace settlement acknowledged the independence, freedom, and sovereignty of the 13 states, to which it granted the much coveted territory west to the Mississippi, and set the northern boundary of the nation nearly as it runs now.